Archive of posts from May 2022


  • Have A Checklist

    Whenever I notice that I need to do something routinely which has a bunch of steps based on certain conditions, I turn to creating a checklist. Having a checklist helps me immensely. If you follow a checklist you can avoid mistakes and complete the work quickly. Take for instance doing taxes. If I did not have a checklist, I am certain to miss something or the other and then will have to file a revised tax form. Of course when there are new entries in the tax form, or if your incomes have changed, I update the checklist. I have similar checklists for making backups of my media (photos, music, movies etc), laptop (code, libraries etc) and even for investing.

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  • Momentum Or Contrarian?

    There are many investment styles, but I am generally in conflict with momentum investing vs contrarian investing. Sometimes I feel like I should be following the momentum style of investing. And most other times I feel like I should be a contrarian investor. If you don’t know those two different styles of investing, don’t worry I will give an explanation. Sometimes momentum strategy works better and at other times a contrarian style works better. Knowing which will work better at any given time is all together another difficult task. I am not really sure which one works best in the long term though.

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  • Financial Independence Trend

    There has been a sharp rise in the F.I.R.E. trend in the recent past. For those who don’t know, F.I.R.E stands for financial independence and retire early. It is the new fad in town which I am also part of :). In the past, people searching for financial independence used to trend around 20 queries a day on Google search. It has more than tripled if you look at the data from the last one year. I wonder why so many are looking for financial independence. Perhaps COVID-19 and the resulting work from home culture are to blame. Or may be the sudden rise in wealth because of the recent stock market bull run is the cause. I have no idea, but people seem to be more interested in F.I.R.E in the recent past more than before. Or at least that is what Google trends is indicating.

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  • The Time I Wished I Was Working

    In the 4 odd years since I retired, I never felt like I was missing out on my salary, except for during this period. The stock markets are falling and RBI has started hiking interest rates. Which means that NAV of both debt mutual funds and equity mutual funds are falling. That only means one thing – invest more! Unfortunately since I don’t get salary or any other income anymore, I have to sell some mutual funds and buy another. Normally I do this by selling the mutual funds that are gaining and buying the mutual funds that are falling. Here I am not talking about individual funds. I am talking about the type or category of mutual funds.

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  • How Is Your Portfolio Doing?

    When ever the market falls, people are curious about my portfolio. They want to know how my portfolio is handling the crash (according to them). I shrug my shoulders and reply “same old”. Yes, that is pretty much my attitude whether the market is going up or down or under. The portfolio is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. Actually, to tell you the truth, the market is certainly not crashing. It is just a correction, at least so far. May be if it falls a lot more from here, I may call it a crash.

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  • Impact Of Repo Rate Hike

    In the previous post we discussed about inflation and how it can be tamed by central banks. One of the ways to reduce inflation is by reducing the amount of money people spend. This can be done by increasing the rate of interests on loans or by making safe investments so attractive that people will save money in banks instead of spending on things. Think of it this way – if your home loan EMI increases, you will have less to spend on other things right? Alternatively, suppose you don’t have any loans, but you are a saver. Then if the FD interest rate went up from 5% to 6%, you might save more instead of spending and causing inflation. That was a very simplified explanation of course, but lets just go with it.

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  • The Curious Case Of Inflation

    RBI has finally increased the repo rate after inflation has been stubbornly high for more than three quarters. I was expecting this to have happened sooner, and yet they were faster than the US central bank. Inflation in the US has been out of control for a very long time now and yet the Fed has not taken any action. Their reasoning for the longest time has been that the inflation is transitory and will eventually come down without any rate action. Why is it transitory? The explanation was that the inflation was due to decrease in supply and not due to increase in demand and when the supply catches up with the demand the inflation should disappear. So far at least that was not the case and Fed has been printing money and keeping the interest rate low. What a mess.

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  • TV Inflation

    It is the season of inflation. Lately we have been hearing a lot about inflation and I have been writing a lot about it too. Still if you thought that wasn’t enough, here is one more for you :). Normally I don’t calculate inflation of anything unless I have at least 10 years worth of data. As I look back, I have as much data on my TVs, so why not calculate the inflation of a TV? Remember that inflation should be looked at holistically. Knowing inflation of one device like TV or laptop does not really makes sense, but all these inflations add up to your final inflation number. It is just a fun exercise and lets keep it that way.

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