Posts tagged with "wordpress"


  • Remark42 As Comments Engine In Jekyll

    After having used Disqus as the comments engine for my Jekyll website for a week or so, I started to dislike it quite a bit due to several reasons. One of which is the requirement of creating an account with Disqus even if the user is logged in via one of the social logins such as Google or Twitter account. The other issue is the privacy aspect with Disqus. Seems like it is tracking too much information about the users. So I decided to use Remark42 instead. The only problem however is that I need to run a server to host it. It defeats the whole purpose of me going absolutely serverless. But I don’t have a choice since some of my readers want comments section.

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  • Adding Comments Section To Jekyll

    As you know, I have recently migrated from Wordpress to static web hosting using Jekyll. But a couple of things were missing on my blog at that time. One was comments section and the other was a search feature. Since I moved to static web hosting, adding a comments engine was not possible. I did not want to add comments section anyway because there weren’t that many comments to start with and I also did not feel like a lot of interaction is happening anyway. Unfortunately a couple of folks noticed that the comments section was missing and were asking me about it. I thought no one would notice, but I was wrong. So I decided to add it grudgingly.

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  • Migrating From Wordpress To Jekyll

    If you read my previous post on Jekyll, you already know why I switched from WordPress to Jekyll. In continuation of that post I want to explain how I migrated to Jekyll. For those who are not interested in the software side of things should skip this post. Wordpress offers a lot of features out of the box, like search engine and comments engine. So all I have to do is write posts and users can search and comment on them. This works because Wordpress is dynamic and runs a DB to store data. However since Jekyll is static, one needs to figure out a way to make things work.

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  • Why I Switched From Wordpress To Jekyll

    The past few days have been quite busy, so I have not been regular with my posts. One of the reasons was because of the migration of my blog from WordPress to Jekyll. This post is going to be a bit technical, so for those who are not interested in software should probably skip this one. I have been using WordPress to publish my blog. My WordPress has been running on a Google Compute Engine instance since I started the blog. But I have been wanting to move away from WordPress for a long time. So I decided to go with static web pages. Unfortunately the process was not quite easy because WordPress offers so many things out of the box. Doing all that work manually was some work, but it was well worth it.

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  • Updating OS in Google Compute Engine

    A few days ago, I decided to update my Google Compute Engine instance which was running an older Debian version. This was the same instance that is hosting this WordPress blog, so I had to be careful not to break anything lest I lose all the data and/or the service can be down. This post is a recount of my journey through the update process because I found some interesting things about Google Compute Engine (GCE) and how things can break if you are not careful and how things can go very smoothly if you plan properly.

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